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Indian Creek and a Misty Morning, North Casacdes National Park. Photo Courtesy of Andy Porter.

Indian Creek and a Misty Morning, North Casacdes National Park. Photo Courtesy of Andy Porter.

Washington State is blessed with incredible rivers that deliver clean cold water to salmon, wildlife, residents, businesses and the Puget Sound. They are central to our unique quality of life. However, few of these rivers are permanently protected from new dam construction, unsustainable logging, mining and unmaintained roads. For example, Washington State has only 250 miles of designated Wild & Scenic Rivers compared to Oregon’s 2,000 miles.

Indian Creek Waterfall, North Cascades National Park.

Indian Creek Waterfall, North Cascades National Park.

The National Wild & Scenic Rivers System was created by Congress in 1968 (full description of WSR Act) to preserve certain rivers with outstanding natural, cultural, and recreational values in a free-flowing condition for the enjoyment of present and future generations. The Act is notable for safeguarding the special character of these rivers, while also recognizing the potential for their appropriate use and development. It encourages river management that crosses political boundaries and promotes public participation in developing goals for river protection.

Washington Wild works with coalition partners to support river management on our public lands and oppose logging, mining and other development that threaten to adversely impact river values. While we understand and support hydro-electric power as a renewable and clean energy source, we oppose proposals to add new dams to free flowing rivers. A better strategy is upgrading power production from the many aging dams that already exist on our rivers and streams.

Apr 17 2017

Conservationists, Recreationists Question Re-Investment in Century-old Dam on Similkameen River

Posted on Apr 17, 2017 in Conservation News, River Management
Conservationists, Recreationists Question Re-Investment in Century-old Dam on Similkameen River

In advance of a public hearing, Washington Wild joined ten conservation and recreation groups who signed onto a letter to the Okanogan Public Utility District raising concerns about the economic, legal and conservation impacts of the re-investment in this century-old dam on Similkameen River. The project would cost $40 million to build, would cost more to operate […]

Dec 16 2016

80 Organizations Urge Federal Government to Say No to New Dam Construction

Posted on Dec 16, 2016 in Conservation News, River Management
80 Organizations Urge Federal Government to Say No to New Dam Construction

Today Washington Wild joined 79 other organizations on a joint letter to the Department of Energy (DOE) coordinated by Hydropower Reform Coalition concerning the economical, ecological,and social impacts of new dam construction. The letter was sent in response to the DOE’s November 2016 Request for Information “Challenges and Opportunities for Sustainable Development of Hydropower in […]

Oct 13 2016

Proposed Dam on North Fork Snoqualmie River Withdrawn

Posted on Oct 13, 2016 in Conservation News, River Management
Proposed Dam on North Fork Snoqualmie River Withdrawn

Black Canyon Hydro LLC announced that it was withdrawing its application for the Black Canyon Hydropower Project. This project would have constructed a new dam on the North Fork Snoqualmie River, severely impacting native rainbow and cutthroat trout, posing a risk to the City of Snoqualmie’s water supply, and irreversibly harming a world-class kayak run. […]

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